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In accordance with the County Charter, I am pleased to transmit the County Executive's Recommended FY21 Capital Budget and Fiscal Year 2021-2026 Capital Improvements Program (CIP). My first full CIP makes significant progress on many of our shared goals, such as, ensuring that students learn in 21st century facilities; supporting transportation solutions that are more environmentally friendly; providing increased access to affordable housing; improving pedestrian, bicyclist, and driver safety; and investing in core infrastructure - despite constrained resources.

In this CIP, I am recommending a six-year total of $4,228,170,000. This budget stays within the Council's approved Spending Affordability Guidelines for General Obligation bonds, leverages significant non-County resources, and recognizes constrained current revenue resources which directly compete with funding in the Operating Budget.

Still, with all that we are able to accomplish in this CIP, I am painfully aware of the need for even more investments in core infrastructure, in our educational institutions, parks, libraries, and other facilities that make Montgomery County a desirable place to live, work, and grow a business. I am convinced that to accomplish our ambitious goals, we must be strategic in leveraging outside funding and in finding more affordable approaches to meeting community needs. I welcome suggestions from the County Council and the public on how to best achieve these goals.

Capital Budget Context

As I developed the CIP, I had to work within constrained resources. Consistent with our Spending Affordability Guideline (SAG) decisions, the General Obligation bonds planned for issuance have been reduced by $90 million compared to the prior approved six-year CIP, with a corresponding reduction of $9 million in Pay-as-you-Go (PAYGO) funding.

Three funding sources provide the bulk of the County's resources for construction - impact taxes, general obligation bonds, and recordation taxes. Based on prior legislation and historical collections, school and transportation impact taxes are estimated to be only $164.1 million - $68.3 million, or 29 percent, less than in the previously approved CIP. Approximately $55 million of this reduction is related to 2015 and 2018 changes in the County's impact tax law.1 The estimated increase in recordation tax revenues does not even offset the decreases in General Obligation bonds related to the SAG changes and impact tax revenues. Consequently, the total resources have been reduced by $65.3 million, or 2.5 percent.

The Capital Budget includes six-year cash funding from PAYGO ($177.0 million) and tax-supported current revenues ($485.4 million). As a result, it is very important to consider the status of the operating budget when making cash CIP decisions. Possible cost increases may occur - such as compensation adjustments, increased benefits costs, Maintenance of Effort requirements related to updated school enrollment estimates, and other cost pressures. These operating budget pressures will limit the ability to cash-fund non-financeable costs in the CIP. As a result, I have deferred recommendations on most requested increases in cash in the CIP until March.

Because of these fiscal constraints, it was not possible to fully fund all of the more than $4.5 billion in requests from Montgomery County departments, Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS), Montgomery College (MC), and the Maryland National-Capital Park and Planning Commission (M-NCPPC). As is generally the case, capital needs - particularly for the large agencies - exceed our ability to fund them in the six - year period. Therefore, in making decisions about what to fund, priority was given to projects advancing Montgomery County Public Schools and early care and education initiatives; expanding affordable housing, bus rapid transit, and Vision Zero safety initiatives; preserving core infrastructure and existing facilities; and stimulating economic development.

Education and Early Care Initiatives

Montgomery County Public Schools

The MCPS CIP request was $1.818 billion - $74.2 million, or 4.3 percent, above the previously approved budget with a $320.4 million increase in the first four years of the CIP. The request was intended to expedite construction or renovations of 21 elementary schools, seven middle schools, and 10 high schools and to provide increased investments in HVAC and outdoor play spaces while also preserving significant investments in roof replacement and other facility infrastructure.

The Recommended MCPS CIP budget is $1.714 billion - over 94 percent of the Board of Education's requested CIP. While MCPS represented 39.9 percent of the prior approved CIP, in the FY21-26 budget, MCPS's share of the total CIP has increased to 40.5 percent in the Recommended CIP. Although six-year total reductions in the CIP ($29.6 million) were required to address fiscal constraints, MCPS funding was maintained for FY21 and was increased by $16.7 million in FY22 to FY24 to help address some of the cost increases and project accelerations requested in the early years of the CIP.

The Recommended CIP assumes flat State Aid funding at the previously approved level of $58.7 million a year. While the Governor and General Assembly have expressed support for significantly increased school construction State Aid, there is not enough information available to assume increases at this time. Current policies and practices result in the County contributing almost 80 percent of school project funding. Unless proposed legislation changes that dynamic, the County will not be able to afford the match required to access significant increases in State Aid. My staff and I will be working with our delegation, the County Council, the Board of Education, the Superintendent, and other school advocates to secure legislation that works for MCPS.



1In 2015, Bill 8-15 established an impact tax exemption for all residential units in a development if at least 25 percent met Moderately Priced Dwelling Unit (MPDU) or comparable affordability standards. Projects receiving Planning Board approval prior to the enactment of Bill 8-15 could not use the exemption. In 2018, Bill 36-17 allowed developments with subdivision plan approval prior to 2015 to amend their approvals to increase the number of affordable units in order to obtain the 25 percent exemption as well. Developments receiving these exemptions are just now being built and taking advantage of this exemption.


Montgomery College

Montgomery College requested a $341.4 million CIP - a $65.2 million, or 23.6 percent, increase over the previously approved budget. The request was intended to expedite library improvements, increase funding for planned lifecycle asset replacement, roof replacement, and site improvements, cover cost increases in the Germantown Student Services Center and Takoma Park/Silver Spring Math and Science Center projects, add funding for a new Phase 2 addition at the Germantown Student Affairs and Science Building, and increase funding for information technology and other cash funded projects.

The Recommended Montgomery College budget is $312.9 million - a $36.7 million, or 13.3 percent, increase over the previous CIP. This level of support will fully fund the Collegewide Physical Education Renovation project, which is supported with Major Facilities Capital Projects funding, and increase overall funding from FY21 to FY24 by $12.4 million. Requested current revenue increases will be considered later when operating budget affordability is clearer.


Early Care and Education Initiative

In a recent County resident survey, only 44 percent of respondents rated the availability of childcare/preschool positively. And only 54 percent of County children demonstrate kindergarten readiness, including just 33 percent of children from low-income households. While the Early Care and Education Initiative is expected to figure more prominently in the operating budget, my Recommended CIP includes a number of projects that support our overall goals of providing quality early care to pre-school children and providing additional supports for at-risk students. MCPS has requested $13.5 million to fund a permanent home for the Early Childhood Center at Watkins Mill High School. My Recommended CIP includes a total of $26.7 million, a $16.7 million increase, to renovate the County's existing childcare facilities and playgrounds to ensure compliance with updated Americans with Disabilities Act standards and to replace modular facilities that are beyond their useful life. The Recommended CIP also adds $1.2 million to fund construction of the Kennedy High School Wellness Center and adds $1.2 million to fund construction of Linkages to Learning Centers at Gaithersburg Elementary School and Silver Spring International Middle School.

Affordable Housing

In the 2019 resident survey, 48 percent of residents reported that the availability of affordable quality housing was somewhat or much worse than two years ago. To respond to this need, my Recommended CIP adds a record $132 million over the next six years to the Affordable Housing Acquisition and Preservation project to facilitate efforts to increase the number of affordable housing units in the County. In addition, my CIP creates a new Affordable Housing Opportunity Fund to leverage funding from other partners to support shorter term financing while affordable housing developers arrange for permanent project financing. Under my Recommended CIP, the County would provide $20 million for the fund with the expectation that the fund will leverage $80 million in financing from public and private partners - for a total of $100 million in new financing for affordable housing. With this fund, the Department of Housing and Community Affairs expects to be more proactive in getting involved in housing deals earlier in the development process where it is important to act quickly to preserve long-term affordable housing. The properties will then be refinanced to preserve long-term affordability, repaying the fund and making funds available for additional acquisitions.

I have also asked departments to look broadly and consider how they can work together differently to support affordable housing efforts. For example, staff in the departments of General Services and Transportation continue to consider how County-owned properties can be leveraged to support additional affordable housing units. Discussions are also underway to look at implementing other financing vehicles to further assist affordable housing development.

My Recommended FY21-26 CIP also fully funds the Housing Opportunities Commission's (HOC) requested CIP. The Recommended CIP provides $7.5 million to support improvements at the HOC's deeply subsidized and income-restricted housing units and $500,000 to complete the demolition of Emory Grove Village while HOC works with its non-profit partners to execute a mixed-income redevelopment strategy for the site.


Climate Friendly Transportation Improvements

Bus Rapid Transit and Other Mass Transit Investments

In the 2019 resident survey, 62 percent of respondents said that traffic had gotten somewhat or much worse over the last two years; and 68 percent of residents rated traffic flow on major streets as Fair or Poor. Furthermore, 90 percent of residents felt that focusing on the ease of getting to places you usually have to visit is Essential or Very Important. We need to work aggressively to develop transit options that increase commuting speed for transit and auto users while simultaneously reducing our dependence on fossil fuels. This summer, the County Council joined me in adding funding for preliminary engineering for the Veirs Mill and MD355 Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) routes. These BRT routes will be designed to move riders more quickly on congested corridors and give residents greener transportation alternatives. My Recommended CIP adds an additional $15 million to complete these engineering studies and includes $14 million for system development and planning costs for the New Hampshire Avenue and North Bethesda Transitway BRT corridors. The County is developing a financing plan to construct and operate the BRT lines. We have already investigated a number of non-County funding sources and will be ready to discuss financing options later this spring. As reported numerous times in the Washington Post this fall, the WMATA Bus Transformation Project, the Greater Washington Partnership, and other groups have indicated that improving bus service is critical to meeting the needs of our growing population and for effectively meeting the requirements of our business community. Implementing the County's BRT plan is necessary to grow our economy, and my CIP recommendation significantly advances this imperative.

In related Mass Transit investments, the CIP includes $40 million for the County's contribution to the Purple Line project, $17.3 million for FY21 transit bus replacements, a $5 million increase to fund design and construction for the Boyds Transit Center bus loop and parking lot, and $2.9 million to provide White Flint Metro Station Access Improvements sooner and more cost effectively than the previously considered approach. Following conversations with Councilmembers and representatives of the White Flint community about the need to improve walking connections to the White Flint Metro Station, the Department of Transportation has identified a combination of streetscape, sidewalk, and intersection improvements that can be implemented in FY21 and FY22. Use of the previously approved funds to implement streetscape, sidewalk and intersection improvements will result in direct, more immediate benefits in White Flint while the County explores more cost-effective station improvement strategies and funding partnerships with WMATA, developers, and other possible stakeholders to advance the second station entrance, currently estimated to cost between $30 to $35 million.


Vision Zero

The CIP includes over $266.6 million for projects that directly relate to the County's Vision Zero Initiative to reduce deaths and serious injuries on County roadways to zero by 2030. New Vision Zero CIP enhancements include an additional:

  • $9.3 million for pedestrian safety initiatives;
  • $4.5 million to improve safety, mobility and accessibility for people biking and walking near Purple Line stations;
  • $4.2 million for Sidewalk Program Minor projects;
  • $2 million to complete the Amherst Avenue Bikeway in the Wheaton Central Business District;
  • $1.9 million to add lighting when constructing the Seven Locks Bikeway and related safety improvements;
  • $1.3 million for Bikeway Program Minor projects; and
  • $665,000 to widen the proposed Good Hope Road Sidewalk to eight feet.

Other Initiatives to Address Climate Change

In addition to these greener transportation initiatives, my Recommended CIP includes funding for energy savings in County buildings and streets, environmental upgrades at the Gude Landfill culminating with a ground mounted solar array, and continued progress in improving stormwater management. In FY20, the County will complete a project to convert 25,000 County streetlights to light emitting diode (LED) lamps with $4.5 million in utility incentives funding. The Recommended CIP also adds $6,990,000 for County Government energy conservation initiatives funded largely by the Pepco/Exelon merger, includes $7.6 million for the renovation and modernization of the Executive Office Building HVAC and other building systems, and $61.8 million for other County energy systems modernizations. The LED Streetlighting project is expected to yield a 55 percent reduction in energy consumption. As energy savings are generated by these projects, funds previously spent on utilities can be diverted to other priorities.

I am also encouraged to see that MCPS is soliciting bids to explore the use of Energy Services Contracts (ESCOs) to finance energy saving improvements. This form of contracting can reduce the need for upfront funding from the County while expediting energy savings and environmental benefits.

The $61.8 million Gude Landfill Remediation project will ensure the closed landfill minimizes leachate infiltration into groundwater and meets the current standards for closed landfills. As part of a consent decree, the design of the remediation cap must be approved by the Maryland Department of the Environment, before construction begins in early FY22.

The County's integrated waste management system has been in place for decades and relies on facilities owned by the County and operated by contractors. The materials recycling facility is over 25 years old, and it does not meet our current or future needs. The Department of Environmental Protection is evaluating options for modernizing the operations including an overhaul of the existing facility, as well as construction of a new facility. The volume of materials needing recycling is greater than the current operational capacity can process, requiring the County to rely on out-of-state vendors. This is not sustainable. Capital expenditure recommendations to address these needs can be expected in the future.

The County has had aggressive requirements in place for addressing water quality issues, through permits issued by the Maryland Department of the Environment, under the Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System Permit (MS4) program. The very stringent impervious surface treatment requirements of the last permit were met in 2018. A new permit is expected to be issued within the next year, and work continues in support of the expected permit requirements. As a leader in stormwater management, the County's MS4 CIP program is expected to remove thousands of pounds of nitrogen and phosphorus from our waterways, in addition to treating almost 4,000 acres of impervious surface.

Addressing Failing Facilities and Infrastructure

One of the County's primary responsibilities is to maintain existing facilities and infrastructure. Investments in repairing and replacing transportation infrastructure are a prominent feature of my Recommended CIP. In total, $180.6 million has been included to patch, rehabilitate and resurface the County's roads. In particular, the Recommended CIP increases funding for resurfacing of residential/rural roads by a total of $17.6 M in FY21 and FY22 with an additional $5.5 million assumed in FY23 and FY26. The Recommended CIP includes a $9 million increase to support design for an additional 21 bridges to maximize use of available State and Federal aid, and $26.7 million has been added to renovate failing bridges and culverts. Almost $19 million has been included to replace four bridges on Brink Road, Garrett Park Road, Glen Road, and Mouth of Monocacy Road. Under my Recommended CIP, sidewalk and curb replacement will increase by $3 million, and an FY20 supplemental to replace a failing section of Davis Mill Road while minimizing impacts on local businesses is also recommended.

I am also recommending six new projects to preserve and protect County buildings and facilities. Through three public safety projects, we will demolish and renovate a portion of the Montgomery County Detention Center to reduce costly maintenance of outdated systems, upgrade the Outdoor Firearms Training Center to meet current training needs and improve range safety, and replace emergency generators and other outdated systems at the Public Safety Communications Center. Two new projects will focus on Recreation facilities. The first project will repair and replace pool slides to improve safety. And, the second project will refresh recreation centers, senior centers, and aquatics facilities. The "refresh" approach has been a highly successful way to quickly and more frequently upgrade libraries in a cost-effective manner, and we want to extend these results to our heavily used Recreation facilities. A new project will also improve the durability and reduce maintenance costs for the Progress Place homeless housing and service facility. The CIP also maintains funding for projects to renovate and repair the Martin Luther King, Jr. Swim Center, the Kennedy Shriver Aquatic Center, and the Red Brick Courthouse.

Additional construction funding has been added to the Child Care Renovations project for a total of $26.7 million in improvements planned for FY21-26. These funds are needed to renovate outdated County childcare facilities and renovate and construct playgrounds to meet ADA requirements.

Economic Development

The business community looks toward government to provide the necessary infrastructure - good schools, transit, and the talent pipeline - that will allow companies to grow. My emphasis on education and infrastructure development in this CIP recognizes this important role of local government in providing a quality business climate.

More specifically, my Recommended CIP includes six-year funding of $145.3 million to support the transit-oriented White Flint Redevelopment initiative and surrounding community amenities. Most recently, I requested, and the County Council approved, a CIP amendment to fund $11.4 million in increased utility relocation costs that were needed to maximize White Flint's development potential. Federal Realty Investment Trust's new 232,000 sq. ft. Class A office building and garage at Pike and Rose is on track to deliver in May 2020; LCOR's Arrowood residential project is scheduled to open in the spring of 2022. Other projects have final approved preliminary plans and are negotiating financing and potential partnerships.

Even with the development that has already occurred, growth in the White Flint Special Taxing District's assessable base has been slower than projected. By the end of FY20, the County will have forward funded over $26 million in White Flint road improvements, and another $45 million is planned to be spent by FY22. As a result, it will be necessary to increase the special tax to support the district's infrastructure needs. Analysis of this issue is ongoing, and I will provide the Council with recommendations later this year.

Other significant redevelopment efforts include the $49.1 million White Oak Redevelopment project. The County's obligations to demolish existing structures and clear the site have been fulfilled, and the County's development partner presented a development schedule to the County Council in 2019. County staff continue to work with the developer to promote further development on the site and the adjacent communities.

In summer 2020, the Wheaton Redevelopment project will be completed. This project is expected to bring economic activity and foot traffic to downtown Wheaton and provide a community plaza for activities and events. Development in downtown Bethesda continues to boom as construction on the Marriott Corporation's new headquarters, the Purple Line, the former Apex building site, and a number of other projects are underway. The Marriott project alone will bring 3,500 employees into the already thriving Bethesda commercial hub.

The County is also investing extensively in FiberNet and ultraMontgomery to make sure that the County remains technologically ready to serve as a center for business, research, and innovation. FiberNet will provide improved connections to the region's data centers, which handle 90 percent of East Coast Internet traffic. FiberNet will also add conduit and fiber networks in the White Oak Science Gateway and increase connectivity to regional networks in Maryland to ensure that Montgomery County has robust, reliable, and resilient broadband.

Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission

The M-NCPPC request was for $253.3 million - a $18.6 million, or 7.9 percent increase, over the previously approved budget. This request included a number of park enhancements including a new Black Hill Regional Park SEED classroom, a second cricket field at the South Germantown Recreational Park, Bethesda Park acquisitions and improvements, Ridge Road Ice Rink improvements, and enhancements at Ovid Hazen Wells Park, Wheaton Regional Park, and urban parks. Funding was also requested for Vision Zero safety improvements and increased investments in core infrastructure.

The Recommended M-NCPPC budget is $231.6 million - over 91 percent of the Commission's request. This total represents a $3.1 million, or 1.3 percent, reduction from the previously approved budget. A significant portion of this reduction ($2.3 million) is related to a decision to defer recommending increases in CIP cash-funded projects until overall operating budget affordability is known.

In addition, the new M-NCPPC Headquarters building is scheduled to open this summer in Wheaton. This $169.9 million project will co-locate M-NCPPC with the Department of Permitting Services, Environmental Protection, Recreation, and Community Use of Public Facilities to facilitate customer service and collaboration amongst the departments and revitalize the Wheaton central business district.

Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC)

My Recommended CIP fully funds the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission's $1,669.8 million FY21-26 CIP request. This represents a $132.9 million, or 8.6 percent increase above the FY20-25 approved total of $1,536.9 million. The increase in six-year costs is the net result of cost changes in both water and sewer projects, with the largest cost increases in the Blue Plains Wastewater Treatment Plant projects and the Large Diameter Water Pipe Rehabilitation program. The first year of the Commission's proposed CIP is consistent with the approved FY21 Council-approved spending control limits.


Fiscal Summary

The tax-supported portion of the Recommended CIP totals $4.032 billion, a decrease of $179.7 million, or 4.3 percent, from the FY19-24 Amended CIP. (Within the CIP, only Stormwater Management, Solid Waste, the Housing Opportunities Commission, and the Revenue Authority are considered non-tax supported.) With all sources of funding for all agencies, excluding WSSC, the Recommended CIP totals $4.228 billion for six years, a decrease of $141.9 million, or 3.2 percent over the FY19-24 Amended CIP. This smaller CIP is a result of the previously mentioned reductions in General Obligation bonds and impact taxes, as well as the completion of several large projects funded with other, mostly non-County funding sources.

The following charts summarize the total requests and the total recommended budget by agency for the FY21-26 CIP. In addition, the charts indicate the share of the total budget each agency would receive and the percent of requests that my Recommended CIP is able to fund with the constrained resources available.

FY21-26 RECOMMENDED CIP ALLOCATIONS AND REQUESTS BY AGENCY


County Executive Recommended FY21-26 CIP ($000s)

Agency Request FY21-26 CIP ($000s)

Percent of Request Recommended

County Government

1,943,891

2,133,244

91.1%

Montgomery County Public Schools

1,714,419

1,818,197

94.3%

Montgomery College

312,850

341,420

91.6%

M-NCPPC

231,560

253,258

91.4%

Revenue Authority

17,450

17,450

100.0%

Housing Opportunities Commission

8,000

8,000

100.0%

Grand Total

4,228,170

4,571,569

92.5%








FY21-26 RECOMMENDED CIP ALLOCATIONS AND REQUESTS BY AGENCY



Agency

County Executive Recommended FY21-26 CIP ($000s)

Percent of Total CIP

County Government

1,943,891

46.0%

Montgomery County Public Schools

1,714,419

40.5%

Montgomery College

312,850

7.4%

M-NCPPC

231,560

5.5%

Revenue Authority

17,450

0.4%

Housing Opportunities Commission

8,000

0.2%

Grand Total

4,228,170

100.0%


My Recommended FY21-26 CIP assumes General Obligation borrowing consistent with the Council approved Spending Affordability Guidelines (SAG) established in October 2019. The SAG guidelines assumed a gradual reduction in annual issuance: $320 million in FY21, $310 million in FY22, $290 million in FY23 and FY24, and $280 million in FY25 and FY26. This CIP also allocates PAYGO funding at 10 percent of General Obligation bonds to be issued each year, which is consistent with approved County fiscal policy and with information shared with the bond rating agencies.

Reductions in general obligation debt help control the increase in debt service and improve operating budget flexibility in recessions. The same MCPS enrollment growth that has led to overcrowding at our schools also brings significant operating budget demands, and it is important that we maintain an ability to meet those demands. Reductions in general obligation debt are also important in maintaining our AAA bond rating. This superior bond rating makes it possible to borrow at lower interest rates, which will allow us to invest in other priorities.

Recordation taxes and impact taxes, respectively, account for $586.2 million and $164.1 million of the CIP funding. The Recommended CIP assumes $199.3 million in other short-term or long-term financing which is used when General Obligation debt cannot be used. Currently State Aid accounts for $462.0 million of the CIP resources, an increase of $8.6 million, or 1.9 percent. These figures could change significantly depending on General Assembly actions related to school construction and affordability adjustments related to Montgomery College projects.

Tax-supported current revenue funding of $84.8 million has been assumed in the Recommended CIP for FY21. This represents a modest $471,000 increase - primarily related to increased costs for MCPS relocatables. Based on current projections, additional current revenue or other CIP reductions may be needed to help address FY21 operating budget shortfalls. As a result, decisions on adding new current revenue funding were generally deferred until they could be considered in the FY21 operating budget context.

The Recommended CIP assumes a $161.6 million set-aside with $15.3 million available in FY21 to cover unanticipated cost increases, revenue shortfalls, or possible operating budget needs.

The proposals highlighted in the pages immediately following and detailed in the specific FY21-26 Recommendations for County Government, Montgomery County Public Schools, Montgomery College, M-NCPPC, WSSC, the Housing Opportunities Commission, and the Revenue Authority, reflect the priorities of my administration. Companion supplemental appropriation requests and/or CIP amendments are being transmitted separately for the following projects: Bicycle-Pedestrian Priority Area Improvements - Veirs Mill/Randolph, Bicycle-Pedestrian Priority Area Improvements - Wheaton CBD, Fenton Street Cycletrack, Affordable Housing Acquisition and Preservation, Bikeways Minor Projects, Agricultural Land Preservation Easements, Davis Mill Road, MCPS: PLAR, and Parking Bethesda Facility Renovations.

Many people have helped to shape the recommendations I am submitting to you in these amendments, and I am grateful for their efforts. I want to thank the members of the Board of Education, the College Trustees, the Planning Board, and WSSC Commissioners for their work.

As stated above, further recommendations relating to current revenue and other CIP initiatives will be provided once I have finalized my March 15th Operating Budget recommendations. I look forward to discussing with you any policy matters or major resource allocation issues that arise this spring. As always, Executive Branch staff will be available to assist in your deliberations on the Capital Budget and CIP.


ME:rsm

c: Marlene Michaelson, Executive Director, County Council
Michael A. Durso, President, Montgomery County Public Schools
Dr. Jack R. Smith, Superintendent, Montgomery County Public Schools
DeRionne P. Pollard, PhD., President, Montgomery College
Casey Anderson, Chair, Montgomery County Planning Board
Carla A. Reid, General Manager/CEO, Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission
Stacy Spann, Executive Director, Housing Opportunities Commission
Keith Miller, Executive Director, Revenue Authority
Executive Branch Department Heads and Office Directors